Alimony is an important topic that is often tied to the divorce process. Also called spousal support, alimony is the payment of money from one party to a divorce to the other. Different jurisdictions have different rules about how alimony may be awarded, and Louisiana has its own laws concerning how long one party may receive financial support from their ex-spouse.

Louisiana recognizes two types of alimony: interim spousal support and final periodic spousal support. Each serves a different purpose and is subject to its own requirements. Readers are reminded that this post offers no legal advice and help on this and other family law topics should be sought from a knowledgeable family law attorney.

Interim spousal support

Interim spousal support is short-term support for a person who cannot provide for themselves during and shortly after their divorce. This form of alimony award may last up to 6 months after the marriage is ended in a divorce decree. Interim spousal support is also dependent upon the paying party’s ability to provide financially for their ex.

Final periodic spousal support

Final periodic spousal support differs from interim spousal support in several ways. First, final periodic spousal support does not necessarily have an end date. Second, it requires that the receiving spouse was not responsible by fault for the end of their marriage. Third, but like interim spousal support, it is dependent upon the paying spouse’s capacity to provide for their former partner.

Both interim spousal support and final periodic spousal support serve important roles in the marital dissolution and divorce processes. There are no guarantees that any form of spousal support will be awarded in Louisiana divorces. Readers with question sand concerns about their alimony options are encouraged to talk to their family law attorneys.